The issue of addiction regarding the use of opioids

Dominion Diagnostics Roy E. Smith, MD A board certified in addiction medicine and family medicine and provides medical care to patients at Pavillon. Smith is involved with the evaluation and treatment of Pavillon patients in the professional program.

The issue of addiction regarding the use of opioids

Opiummorphineheroinand related synthetics The opiates are unrivalled in their ability to relieve pain. Opium is the dried milky exudate obtained from the unripe seed pods of the opium poppy plant Papaver somniferumwhich grows naturally throughout most of Turkey.

Of the 20 or more alkaloids found in opium, only a few are pharmacologically active. The important constituents of opium are morphine 10 percentpapaverine 1 percentcodeine 0. Papaverine is pharmacologically distinct from the narcotic agents and is essentially devoid of effects on the central nervous system.

Codeine is considerably less potent one-sixth and is obtained from morphine.

The issue of addiction regarding the use of opioids

Diacetylmorphine—or heroin —was developed from morphine by the Bayer Company of Germany in and is 5 to 10 times as potent as morphine itself. Opiates are not medically ideal. Tolerance is developed quite rapidly and completely in the more important members of the group, morphine and heroin, and they are highly addictive.

In addition, they produce respiratory depression and frequently cause nausea and emesis. As a result, there has been a constant search for synthetic substitutes: These synthetics exhibit a more favourable tolerance factor than the more potent of the opiates, but in being addictive they fall short of an ideal analgesic.

Of this entire series, codeine has the least addiction potential and heroin has the greatest. History of opiates The narcotic and sleep-producing qualities of the poppy have been known to humankind throughout recorded history.

Sumerian records from ancient Mesopotamia to bce refer to the poppy, and medicinal reference to opium is contained in Assyrian medical tablets. The Romans probably learned of opium during their conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. Galen — ce was an enthusiastic advocate of the virtues of opium, and his books became the supreme authority on the subject for hundreds of years.

The art of medicinals was preserved by the Islamic civilization following the decline of the Roman Empire. Opium was introduced by the Arabs to Persia, China, and India.

Paracelsus —professor at the University of Basel, introduced laudanum, a tincture of opium. Le Mort, a professor of chemistry at the University of Leyden —18discovered paregoric, useful for the control of diarrhea, by combining camphor with tincture of opium. There is no adequate comprehensive history of the addictive aspects of opium use in spite of the fact that it has been known since antiquity.

Because there were few alternative therapeutics or painkillers until the 19th century, opium was somewhat of a medical panacea. Thus, although at least one account, in by a London physician named Jones, spoke of an excessive use of opium, there appears to have been no real history of concern until recent times, and opiates were easily available in the West in the 19th century—for instance, in a variety of patent medicines.

Physicians prescribed them freely, they were easy to obtain without prescription, and they were used by all social classes. At one time the extensive use of these medicines for various gynecological difficulties probably accounted for high addiction rates among women three times the rate among men.

The invention of the hypodermic needle in the midth century and its subsequent use to administer opiates during wartime produced large numbers of addicted soldiers aboutduring the U.

Civil War alone ; it was thought mistakenly that if opiates were administered by vein, no hunger or addiction would develop, since the narcotic did not reach the stomach.

By the turn of the 20th century, narcotic use had become a worldwide problem, and various national and international regulatory bodies sought to control opium traffic in China and Southeast Asia. In the 20th century, narcotic use was largely associated with metropolitan slums, principally among the poor and culturally deprived.

Narcotic use eventually spread to middle-class youth. Physiological effects of opiates The various opiates and related synthetics produce similar physiological effects.

All are qualitatively similar to morphine in action and differ from each other mainly in degree. The most long-lasting and conspicuous physiological responses are obtained from the central nervous system and the smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract.

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These effects, while restricted, are complex and vary with the dosage and the route of administration intravenous, subcutaneous, oral.Effects of Opiate Abuse. Often, the facts about the effects of opiate use are misleading because they may only focus on the short-term impact. For example, opiates often cause vomiting and diarrhea, sedation and delayed reactions in the short term.

The epidemic of opioid abuse is related in part to incomplete understanding of pain-relief management, opioid tolerance, and opioid addiction. Among the prevention strategies are more widespread.

The issue of addiction regarding the use of opioids

Studies that address the patterns of heroin use in nonmedical users of prescription opioids are mostly observational and descriptive (i.e., nonexperimental).

Chronic pain management is a public health concern with significant increases in the use of opioids for pain relief. There is a corresponding growth in the number of opioids prescribed in the U.S.

and the overdose from those drugs. 1,2,3 Family physicians and other primary care providers play a vital role in balancing patients’ pain management .

The opioid epidemic or opioid crisis is the rapid increase in the use of prescription and non-prescription opioid drugs in the United States and Canada beginning in the late s and continuing throughout the next two decades.

The increase in opioid overdose deaths has been dramatic, and opioids are now responsible for 49, of the 72, drug overdose deaths overall in the US in The north wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art is a vast, airy enclosure featuring a banked wall of glass and the Temple of Dendur, a sandstone monument that was constructed beside the Nile two.

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