An introduction to the poetry of kazuko shiraishi

.

An introduction to the poetry of kazuko shiraishi

Email this page In a reminiscence written for the Los Angeles Times Book Review, Kenneth Rexroth's friend and former student Thomas Sanchez portrayed the author as a "longtime iconoclast, onetime radical, Roman Catholic, Communist fellow traveler, jazz scholar, I.

An introduction to the poetry of kazuko shiraishi

The length and breadth of his career resulted in a body of work that not only chronicles his personal search for visionary transcendence but also reflects the artistic, cultural, and political vicissitudes of more than half a century. He experimented amid Chicago's "second renaissance" in the early s, explored modernist techniques derived from the European-born "revolution of the word," played an integral part in the anarchist-pacifist politics and poetic mysticism that pervaded San Francisco's Bay Area in the s, and affiliated himself with the "Beat Generation" in the mids.

Intellectually as well as artistically eclectic, Rexroth scorned institutionalized education and criticism, calling American academics "corn belt Metaphysicals and country gentlemen," as M.

Rosenthal noted in The Modern Poets. After quitting school in his early teens, the poet pursued a curriculum of self-education that included not only literature from diverse cultures and times but encompassed science, philosophy, theology, anthropology, Oriental thought and culture, and half a dozen languages.

McKaye of the Washington Post emphasized: And 'everything' is not just the standard European classics in translation: Published inThe Phoenix and the Tortoise was called by Morgan Gibson in his book Kenneth Rexroth, "much more coherent in style and theme" than Rexroth's earlier work while focusing less on experimentation and politics.

Beginnings

Instead, the book initiated a study of "the 'integral person' who, through love, discovers his responsibility for all in a world of war, cold war, and nuclear terror. It is all there, all the things we cherish, all our aspirations, and over it all a kind of Buddhist calm.

Rexroth's purpose is to make a particular kind of poem which will be classical in its restraint, but without severity; personal, revealing, and confessional, without being sentimental; and it must, according to his bent, eschew symbolism and any kind of ambiguous imagery for a narrative or statement strength based on noun and verb, but not weakened by adjectives.

Generally varying from seven to nine syllables per line, the structure allowed him to emphasize the "natural cadences of speech," which Gibson pointed out had been important to the poet from the days of his earliest Cubist experiments. Looking back to the s, Karl Malkoff remarked in a Southern Review: Here his work is most vulnerable; here his successes, when they come, are most striking.

Rexroth hit upon the seven syllable line as a temporary resolution, he was accused of writing prose broken up into lines. Actually, on rereading, Rexroth's ear proves reasonably reliable.

New and Selected Poems, thus reaffirming the importance of an element critics had dismissed earlier as ineffective or unimportant. Rexroth's tetralogy of verse plays in "natural numbers," Beyond the Mountainsproves not only his devotion to the natural patterns of speech but indicates his knowledge of classical Greek and Oriental literature.

Gibson claimed in his study that the author's "poetic, philosophical, and visionary powers [reached] their epitome" in the four dramas "Phaedra," "Iphigenia at Aulis," "Hermaios," and "Berenike. As Gibson related, an "important quality of Noh found in Rexroth's plays is yugen, a term derived from Zen Buddhism and defined by Arthur Waley as 'what lies beneath the surface'; the subtle, as opposed to the obvious; the hint, as opposed to the statement.

Flint, who wrote in Poetry that the "plotting has been just a shade too ambitious for [Rexroth's] poetic gift"—the renowned poet William Carlos Williams applauded both the work's language and its form. His work is cleanly straightforward.Kazuko Shiraishi is a Japanese poet and translator who was born in Vancouver, Canada.

An introduction to the poetry of kazuko shiraishi

She is a modernist, outsider poet who got her start in Katsue Kitazono's "VOU" poetry group, which led Shiraishi to publish her first book of poems in /5(11). KAZUKO SHIRAISHI ~ Summer Time — The Full Moon Japanese Poetry, Kazuko Shiraishi, New Directions. No comments: Post a Comment.

Older Post Home. Longhouse. Robin Magowan. The Garden of Amazement, Scattered Gems After Sâeb. large softcover glossy bound with an introduction by the translator, pages. Introduction. This section of the BPS website is devoted to writings by and about the great poet, essayist, social critic and Renaissance man, Kenneth Rexroth ().

Readings of Rexroth’s poetry: Selected Poems of Kazuko Shiraishi Selected Poems of Pierre Reverdy 14 . Search form.

Author Information

Search. Advanced Search. Kazuko Shiraishi is a Japanese poet and translator who was born in Vancouver, Canada. She is a modernist, outsider poet who got her start in Katsue Kitazono's "VOU" poetry group, which led Shiraishi to publish her first book of poems in /5. Introduction.

Kenneth Rexroth | Poetry Foundation He was a dyed-in-the-wool, non-violent anarchist. There were two classes of kids, and they Had nothing in common:
TOKYO (6 a.m.) I am reliving a lot of my past through this endeavor. Some of these books have been collecting dust or even been imprisoned in boxes.
Editorial Reviews

.

ToPoJo’s “Deep Beatitude” | Kyoto Journal

.

Sam Rivers Sessionography

.

This section of the BPS website is devoted to writings by and about the great poet, essayist, social critic and Renaissance man, Kenneth Rexroth ().

Translations from Longhouse