An introduction to the history and politics of japan

The reforms nationalized all land in Japan, to be distributed equally among cultivators, and ordered the compilation of a household registry as the basis for a new system of taxation.

An introduction to the history and politics of japan

Introduction to Japanese Politics - Hayes - Google Books

Prehistoric Japan Pre-Ceramic culture It is not known when humans first settled on the Japanese archipelago. It was long believed that there was no Paleolithic occupation in Japan, but since World War II thousands of sites have been unearthed throughout the country, yielding a wide variety of Paleolithic tools.

These include both core toolsmade by chipping away the surface of a stone, and flake toolsmade by working with a stone flake broken off from a larger piece of stone. There is little doubt that the people who used these implements moved to Japan from the Asian continent.

Important Japanese historical sites. The Paleolithic Period in Japan is variously dated from 30, to 10, years ago, although the argument has been made for a Lower Paleolithic culture prior to 35, bce.

Nothing certain is known of the culture of the period, though it seems likely that people lived by hunting and gathering, used fire, and made their homes either in pit-type dwellings or in caves. No bone or horn artifacts of the kind associated with this period in other areas of the world have yet been found in Japan.

Since there was no knowledge whatsoever of pottery, the period is referred to as the Pre-Ceramic era. Climatic changes help to account for the existence of a Mesolithic stage in early Japanese culture, a time when much of the abundant fauna of earlier times became depleted by the expanding human population of the archipelago.

The introduction of the bow and arrow is regarded as a local response to a decrease in game available for food. The former takes its name from a type of pottery found throughout the archipelago; its discoverer, the 19th-century American zoologist Edward S.

While continental influence is suspected, the fact that Kyushu pottery remains predate any Chinese findings strongly suggests that the impetus to develop pottery was local. It is customary to regard changes in pottery types as a basis for subdividing the age into six periods: The pottery of the Incipient and Initial periods includes many deep urnlike vessels with tapered bullet-shaped bases.

In the Early period the vessels of eastern Japan become roughly cylindrical in shape, with flat bases, and the walls contain an admixture of vegetable fibre. The surfaces of these normally cylindrical vessels are covered with complex patterns of raised lines, and powerfully decorative projections rise from the rims to form handles.

From the Middle period onward there is increasing variety in the types of vessels, and a clear distinction developed between high-quality ware using elaborate techniques and simpler, purely functional pots.

An introduction to the history and politics of japan

The amount of the latter type increases steadily, preparing the way for the transition to Yayoi pottery. They can be classified into two types: Remains of such dwellings have been found in groups ranging from five or six to several dozen, apparently representing the size of human settlements at the time.

Most of these settlements form a horseshoe shape, with a space in the centre that seems to have been used for communal purposes. Nothing certain is known, however, concerning social or political organization at this period. It can be deduced that each household was made up of several family members and that the settlement made up of such households was led by a headman or shaman.

The appearance of large settlements from the Middle period onward has been interpreted by some scholars as implying the cultivation of certain types of crop—a hypothesis seemingly supported by the fact that the chipped-stone axes of this period are not sharp but seem to have been used for digging soil.

Doubtless there was some form of cultivation: Weaving of fibres was still unknown, though woven baskets have been found dating to the Early period.

Archaeological findings indicate that clothes were largely made of bark. Body ornamentation included bracelets made of seashells, earrings of stone or clay, and necklaces and hair ornaments of stone or bone and horn. From the latter part of the period, the custom also spread throughout the archipelago of extracting or sharpening certain teeth, probably performed as a rite marking the attainment of adulthood.

No especially elaborate rites of burial evolved, and the dead were buried in a small pit dug near the dwelling. Sometimes the body was buried with its knees drawn up or with a stone clasped to its chest, a procedure that probably had some religious or magical significance.

A large number of clay figurines have been found, many representing female forms that were probably magical objects associated with primitive fertility cults.

Despite certain variations in character arising from differences in period or place, they seem to have constituted a single ethnic stock with more or less consistent characteristics.

The present Japanese people were produced by an admixture of certain strains from the Asian continent and from the South Pacific, together with adaptations made in accordance with environmental changes. There is evidence to suggest that people moved eastward across Siberia and entered Japan via Sakhalin Island and Hokkaido.

Nothing can yet be proved concerning their relationship with the people of the Pre-Ceramic period, but it cannot be asserted that they were entirely unrelated. The Yayoi period c.

The name Yayoi derives from the name of the district in Tokyo where, inthe unearthing of pottery of this type first drew the attention of scholars. It developed, in short, as pottery for practical use. It is accompanied by metal objects and is associated with the wet i.An example of the political culture in Japan is the peoples deference towards political elites as shown throughout history.

A nation's political culture includes its citizen's orientations towards three levels: the political system, the political and policymaking process, and policy outputs and outcomes.

General overviews of Japanese politics provide surveys of Japan’s history, political institutions, and policymaking process.

Japanese History/Introduction - Wikibooks, open books for an open world

These overviews can be divided into three categories: historical, thematic, and pre- or post-reform assessments. History Ancient Japan to Prehistoric Japan The introduction of the bow and arrow is regarded as a local response to a decrease in game that Japan had already achieved a considerable degree of political unification.

Japanese historians long sought to emphasize the antiquity and degree of unity of Yamatai in order to aggrandize Japan. Introduction to Japanese Politics, now in its fully updated sixth edition, is a comprehensive and current review of political and public policy developments in Japan.

Since the previous edition, Japan’s economic policy has undergone significant. Introduction to Japanese Politics, now in its fully updated sixth edition, is a comprehensive and current review of political and public policy developments in Japan.

Since the previous edition, Japan’s economic policy has undergone significant change with a prolonged period of deflation having altered the dynamics of the Japanese initiativeblog.coms: 1. This widely used text is an even-handed, forthright attempt to explain the political life of Japan as well as the forces that shape it.

It demystifies this complex society by explaining the historical background for modern Japan; the political process, its formal structure, the party system, and citizen participation; the social order and the domestic economy; and Japan's role in international Reviews: 1.

Osaka Introduction -- History of Osaka